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Erratum regarding previously published articles

    Published:August 18, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcot.2021.101570
        Owing to a Publisher error Declaration of Competing Interest statements were not included in the published versions of the following articles, that appeared in the previous issues of Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma.
        The appropriate “Declaration of Competing Interest statements”, provided by the Authors, are included below.
        • 1.
          “Surgical management of the acute severely infected diabetic foot – The ‘infected diabetic foot attack’. An instructional review” (Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma, 2021; 18: 114–120) https://10.1016/j.jcot.2021.04.012.
        Declaration of Competing Interest: The Authors have no interests to declare.
        • 2.
          “Saving the ankle in distal fibular giant cell tumour – A case report” (Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma, 2019; 10: 1054–1058) https://10.1016/j.jcot.2019.03.010.
        Declaration of Competing Interest: The Authors have no interests to declare.
        • 3.
          “Practice guidelines for Proximal Humeral Fractures” (Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics and Trauma, 2019; 10: 631–633) https://10.1016/j.jcot.2019.04.005.
        Declaration of Competing Interest: The Authors have no interests to declare.

        Linked Article

        • Saving the ankle in distal fibular giant cell tumour – A case report
          Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics & TraumaVol. 10Issue 6
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            Distal Fibula Giant cell tumour (GCT) is a rare condition. The described methods of treatment for distal fibula GCT include excision of tumour and ankle arthrodesis, replacement of distal fibula with ipsilateral proximal fibula and autograft or allograft reconstruction. This case report describes treatment of distal fibula grade 3 GCT with involvement of syndesmosis with tumour excision, proximal fibular slide and reconstruction of ankle joint. With this technique the ankle joint movements are preserved and stability is maintained.
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        • Practice guidelines for proximal humeral fractures
          Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics & TraumaVol. 10Issue 3
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            Proximal Humerus Fractures (PHF) is a source of a dilemma to most of us. While literature supports conservative treatment,1–3 there is an increasing trend of surgical intervention in the last 20 years. Recent advances in fixation methods encouraged many to fix them surgically. The initial promise of locking plates & screws could not be fulfilled in older, weak, osteoporotic bones. Varus collapse, screw cut-outs & greater tuberosity non-union are becoming increasingly common.
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        • Surgical management of the acute severely infected diabetic foot – The ‘infected diabetic foot attack’. An instructional review
          Journal of Clinical Orthopaedics & TraumaVol. 18
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            Diabetic Foot Infection (DFI), in its severest form the acute infected ‘diabetic foot attack’, is a limb and life threatening condition if untreated. Acute infection may lead to tissue necrosis and rapid spread through tissue planes, in the patient with poorly controlled diabetes facilitated by the host status. A combination of soft tissue infection and osteomyelitis may co-exist, in particular if chronic osteomyelitis serves as a persistent source for recurrence of soft tissue infection. This “diabetic foot attack” is characterised by acutely spreading infection and substantial soft tissue necrosis.
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